Top Tips – Avoiding and dealing with Express Kidnapping.

unspecified/>


Express kidnapping is on the rise. Over the last years, its prevalence has been widespread across Latin America but latest statistics demonstrate an increase in the number of cases occurring in North America, one of the most recent having taken place in Florida.

An Express Kidnap occurs when an individual is targeted, captured and held for a period of, usually, hours. The perpetrator hasn’t necessarily planned the kidnap and may not have anywhere to hold the victim so the crime tends to be for small amounts of cash obtained within a short period of time. Often, the victim is taken to various ATMs and forced to withdraw cash or taken to their own home and forced to hand over valuables.   The crimes can be violent and victims are often drugged in the process..

The criminals will often be looking for key indicators when selecting a victim so it is important to not only be aware of what they may be looking for and try to avoid it but to also know how to deal with such an event should you become victim to it.

We have put together a list of some of, what we feel, are useful tips and advice:Avoid all company logos on clothing, cars and visible documents or equipment. The profile of the company means that the logo is a wealth indicator and tells the street criminal that you represent a high profile organisation with cash and may pay dearly for your release.

 

        • Avoid all company logos on clothing, cars and visible documents or equipment. The profile of the company means that the logo is a wealth indicator and tells the street criminal that you represent a high profile organisation with cash and may pay dearly for your release.
        •  Do not carry company Logo business cards in your wallet; in a street robbery the criminal will see your rank and grade upon opening it and a telephone number to ring and demand money – so avoid all logos and mention of rank.
        • Limit cash withdrawal on all of your credit and debit card.
        • Consider a tracking device and panic alarm on your cell phone.
        • Have two safes in the house – one obvious with a few documents and some cash/valuables, the other hidden with the real wealth.
        • Use a family duress code that you can use in a telephone conversation that indicates to your family that you are a hostage and are potentially being forced to bring kidnappers home with you. This gives the family time to escape the house and raise the alarm.
        • At night, avoid walking alone. If you have to walk, only do so in well illuminated areas and always walk towards oncoming traffic, that way no car can approach you from behind and grab you into the car.
        • Be cautious if you are involved in a slight ‘bump’ in your car at a road junction for example. Never get out of the car to talk to the other person or persons involved – these are classic carjacking and Express Kidnap tactics

 

We hope that the above recommendations would help you both avoid and deal with an event but cannot guarantee the outcome in any way. We have extensive experience of clients who have found themselves in similar situations, so please drop us a line for any more information / questions you may have and we will try to help:

Jessica.mayhew@markhambrokers.com

Or call us:

0044 (0) 1223 200678

 

_________________________________________________________________________________ _ _Pencil

NYA – Global Kidnap for Ransom Update – December 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please click here to access NYA’s Global Kidnap for Ransom Update – December 2015:

      • Hostages taken at Mali hotel.
      • Kidnapping reaches epidemic proportions in Venezuela.
      • Ecuadorian businessman rescued in Colombia.
      • Two aid workers abducted in Yemen.

 

Source:  www.nyainternational.com

Pencil

 

_________________________________________________________________________________ _ _ _

 

Top Tips – Awareness on the Street

ThinkstockPhotos-510243689-min


Many police forces around the world use “awareness and presence” techniques to ensure safety when out and about, encouraging the individual to think of ways to avoid becoming a target and to be aware of their surroundings at all times. Learning to be observant is crucial and can enable the individual to react appropriately as their mental state is prepared for the hazard. The mental jump from a very a relaxed state to a state in which they need to react quickly can be too overwhelming, and often the individual will freeze.

We have put together a list of some of, what we feel, are useful tips to keep yourself safe on the street both at home and abroad:

  • Try to keep a low profile. Dress and behave conservatively – do not display cash or jewellery.
  • Avoid any behavior which could make others see you as wealthy.
  • Politely, try to avoid any conversation which may be controversial.
  • If confronted by armed attackers, always give up your valuables. Do not resist. Never carry large quantities of cash, or any items on you that you are not prepared to lose
  • Know how to use public telephones. Carry a local phone card and small change at all times for emergencies.
  • If abroad, familiarize yourself with the uniforms and credentials of public services, e.g. the police.
  • Never display large amounts of money when paying, take out only the correct sum. Carry your money in a moneybag or disperse it throughout your garments. Place wallets and purses in zipper or inside pockets.
  • Treat with caution accidents, unusual occurrences, distractions and distress calls as they may be hoaxes.
  • When out at night, avoid excessive drinking of alcoholic beverages, especially if alone. Never accept a beverage in an open container from a stranger or recent acquaintance.
  • Maintain at least two arms distance from any enquiring stranger, when asked for a cigarette, the time, etc.
  • Walk on well-lit busy streets as much as possible, facing on-coming traffic. Avoid shortcuts.
  • If you think you are being followed, cross the road and keep walking. If still worried make for a well-lit public place or police station, hotel lobby, etc.

 

We hope that the above recommendations would help you both avoid and deal with an event but cannot guarantee the outcome in any way. We have extensive experience of clients who have found themselves in similar situations, so please drop us a line for any more information / questions you may have and we will try to help:

Jessica.mayhew@markhambrokers.com

Or call us:

0044 (0) 1223 200678

Pencil

 

_________________________________________________________________________________ _ _ _